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littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
littlelimpstiff14u2:

The Disturbing Realism of Till Rabus
Till Rabus
Art · May 24, 2013
In addition to his penchant for realism, Swiss artist Till Rabus has a keen eye for arranging inanimate objects in provoking ways. The artist combines these two skills in his strange still lifes, where ordinary, discarded objects are found in mysterious compositions that play with symmetry and saturated colors. Rabus eradicates any signs of human presence in his paintings, as if these objects ended up in these orderly arrangements out of their own free will. Yet these are objects left behind from human consumption, inviting a dialogue about the wastefulness of consumer culture. In his latest work, the artist investigates the human figure, creating structures from writhing body parts.  Txt Ignant ( NSFW )
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darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maja Ruznic
From The Removal of Fingers and Other Body Parts
In this new work, I look at how the woman’s body has historically been used in war as a site to assert power through rape and a vehicle for inter-generational trauma.  Inspired by the writings of Julia Kristeva, I made paintings that explore the elements of war and violence that continue to ooze long after the violence has ended.  Kristeva defines the abject as something that provokes disgust, a human reaction to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other.  Kristeva associates the abject with the eruption of the Real into our life—the Real being the materiality that shows us our own death.  Her writing creates an opening for me to look at how women who have been raped in war carry guilt and shame for the rest of their lives and continue to be degraded by their communities.  The figures in my narrative paintings are broken, defeated and dirty.  Some of the figures have missing limbs and it is difficult to differentiate between the victim and the aggressor.  I blur the line to show how in times of war, aggressors can become emotionally vacuous while before the war they were “healthy” men.  Traumatic events usually leave both individuals—the victims as well as the aggressors emotionally scarred.  Despite their embodied traumas, I have imbued these figures with a redemptive quality and given the abject within them a place to thrive.  (artist statement)
1. And She Carved Him Out Herself
2. Bath Time
3. On His Way
4. Accident
5. The Big Purge
Via
 
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maja Ruznic
From The Removal of Fingers and Other Body Parts
In this new work, I look at how the woman’s body has historically been used in war as a site to assert power through rape and a vehicle for inter-generational trauma.  Inspired by the writings of Julia Kristeva, I made paintings that explore the elements of war and violence that continue to ooze long after the violence has ended.  Kristeva defines the abject as something that provokes disgust, a human reaction to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other.  Kristeva associates the abject with the eruption of the Real into our life—the Real being the materiality that shows us our own death.  Her writing creates an opening for me to look at how women who have been raped in war carry guilt and shame for the rest of their lives and continue to be degraded by their communities.  The figures in my narrative paintings are broken, defeated and dirty.  Some of the figures have missing limbs and it is difficult to differentiate between the victim and the aggressor.  I blur the line to show how in times of war, aggressors can become emotionally vacuous while before the war they were “healthy” men.  Traumatic events usually leave both individuals—the victims as well as the aggressors emotionally scarred.  Despite their embodied traumas, I have imbued these figures with a redemptive quality and given the abject within them a place to thrive.  (artist statement)
1. And She Carved Him Out Herself
2. Bath Time
3. On His Way
4. Accident
5. The Big Purge
Via
 
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maja Ruznic
From The Removal of Fingers and Other Body Parts
In this new work, I look at how the woman’s body has historically been used in war as a site to assert power through rape and a vehicle for inter-generational trauma.  Inspired by the writings of Julia Kristeva, I made paintings that explore the elements of war and violence that continue to ooze long after the violence has ended.  Kristeva defines the abject as something that provokes disgust, a human reaction to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other.  Kristeva associates the abject with the eruption of the Real into our life—the Real being the materiality that shows us our own death.  Her writing creates an opening for me to look at how women who have been raped in war carry guilt and shame for the rest of their lives and continue to be degraded by their communities.  The figures in my narrative paintings are broken, defeated and dirty.  Some of the figures have missing limbs and it is difficult to differentiate between the victim and the aggressor.  I blur the line to show how in times of war, aggressors can become emotionally vacuous while before the war they were “healthy” men.  Traumatic events usually leave both individuals—the victims as well as the aggressors emotionally scarred.  Despite their embodied traumas, I have imbued these figures with a redemptive quality and given the abject within them a place to thrive.  (artist statement)
1. And She Carved Him Out Herself
2. Bath Time
3. On His Way
4. Accident
5. The Big Purge
Via
 
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maja Ruznic
From The Removal of Fingers and Other Body Parts
In this new work, I look at how the woman’s body has historically been used in war as a site to assert power through rape and a vehicle for inter-generational trauma.  Inspired by the writings of Julia Kristeva, I made paintings that explore the elements of war and violence that continue to ooze long after the violence has ended.  Kristeva defines the abject as something that provokes disgust, a human reaction to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other.  Kristeva associates the abject with the eruption of the Real into our life—the Real being the materiality that shows us our own death.  Her writing creates an opening for me to look at how women who have been raped in war carry guilt and shame for the rest of their lives and continue to be degraded by their communities.  The figures in my narrative paintings are broken, defeated and dirty.  Some of the figures have missing limbs and it is difficult to differentiate between the victim and the aggressor.  I blur the line to show how in times of war, aggressors can become emotionally vacuous while before the war they were “healthy” men.  Traumatic events usually leave both individuals—the victims as well as the aggressors emotionally scarred.  Despite their embodied traumas, I have imbued these figures with a redemptive quality and given the abject within them a place to thrive.  (artist statement)
1. And She Carved Him Out Herself
2. Bath Time
3. On His Way
4. Accident
5. The Big Purge
Via
 
darksilenceinsuburbia:

Maja Ruznic
From The Removal of Fingers and Other Body Parts
In this new work, I look at how the woman’s body has historically been used in war as a site to assert power through rape and a vehicle for inter-generational trauma.  Inspired by the writings of Julia Kristeva, I made paintings that explore the elements of war and violence that continue to ooze long after the violence has ended.  Kristeva defines the abject as something that provokes disgust, a human reaction to a threatened breakdown in meaning caused by the loss of the distinction between subject and object or between self and other.  Kristeva associates the abject with the eruption of the Real into our life—the Real being the materiality that shows us our own death.  Her writing creates an opening for me to look at how women who have been raped in war carry guilt and shame for the rest of their lives and continue to be degraded by their communities.  The figures in my narrative paintings are broken, defeated and dirty.  Some of the figures have missing limbs and it is difficult to differentiate between the victim and the aggressor.  I blur the line to show how in times of war, aggressors can become emotionally vacuous while before the war they were “healthy” men.  Traumatic events usually leave both individuals—the victims as well as the aggressors emotionally scarred.  Despite their embodied traumas, I have imbued these figures with a redemptive quality and given the abject within them a place to thrive.  (artist statement)
1. And She Carved Him Out Herself
2. Bath Time
3. On His Way
4. Accident
5. The Big Purge
Via
 
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mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
mango-popsicle:

RUSSIA: CRAFT: ANN KHOKHLOVA
Find more of Ann’s work on her site and keep up with MP on Facebook.
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Estas maletas en la calle, serán un mensaje divino? #Suitcase #travel #maleta #viaje
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#my #sunday #afternoon
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womensweardaily:

Osman Resort 2015
Courtesy Photo
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cafuneus:

brandonproject:

Cool Triumph by Loaded Gun Customs.

Triumph
cafuneus:

brandonproject:

Cool Triumph by Loaded Gun Customs.

Triumph
cafuneus:

brandonproject:

Cool Triumph by Loaded Gun Customs.

Triumph
cafuneus:

brandonproject:

Cool Triumph by Loaded Gun Customs.

Triumph
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unexplained-events:

Codex Seraphinianus
Written in a strange language by Italian architect, Luigi Serafini in 1981. This is one of the strangest encyclopedia ever written.It consists of hand-drawn, colored-pencil illustrations of bizarre and fantastical world. All of it drawn by Serafini himself. Some of the illustrations are considered to be beautiful while others are considered to be a bit more on the disturbing side. 
The only thing known for sure about this book is that “Seraphinianus” is a variation of the author’s name. The alpahabet has about two-dozen characters which relate to nothing else humanity has ever seen.
unexplained-events:

Codex Seraphinianus
Written in a strange language by Italian architect, Luigi Serafini in 1981. This is one of the strangest encyclopedia ever written.It consists of hand-drawn, colored-pencil illustrations of bizarre and fantastical world. All of it drawn by Serafini himself. Some of the illustrations are considered to be beautiful while others are considered to be a bit more on the disturbing side. 
The only thing known for sure about this book is that “Seraphinianus” is a variation of the author’s name. The alpahabet has about two-dozen characters which relate to nothing else humanity has ever seen.
unexplained-events:

Codex Seraphinianus
Written in a strange language by Italian architect, Luigi Serafini in 1981. This is one of the strangest encyclopedia ever written.It consists of hand-drawn, colored-pencil illustrations of bizarre and fantastical world. All of it drawn by Serafini himself. Some of the illustrations are considered to be beautiful while others are considered to be a bit more on the disturbing side. 
The only thing known for sure about this book is that “Seraphinianus” is a variation of the author’s name. The alpahabet has about two-dozen characters which relate to nothing else humanity has ever seen.
unexplained-events:

Codex Seraphinianus
Written in a strange language by Italian architect, Luigi Serafini in 1981. This is one of the strangest encyclopedia ever written.It consists of hand-drawn, colored-pencil illustrations of bizarre and fantastical world. All of it drawn by Serafini himself. Some of the illustrations are considered to be beautiful while others are considered to be a bit more on the disturbing side. 
The only thing known for sure about this book is that “Seraphinianus” is a variation of the author’s name. The alpahabet has about two-dozen characters which relate to nothing else humanity has ever seen.